1 – Borlaug: How the Ag Industry Can Change the Conversation on Biotech, Pesticides | AgriBusiness Global

August 17, 2016 – By: Jackie Pucci

“The only reason the Green Revolution was successful (was that) he took the young researchers and farmers out of their environment and they came to Mexico. He knew the older farmers and researchers would tell them the new methods wouldn’t work,” Julie Borlaug said in her keynote speech. “My grandfather said that fear of change is the biggest obstacle to progress.”

Julie Borlaug says it’s time to stop sitting back and letting anti-GMO activists drive the conversation around agriculture. It’s time to engage those who have lost touch with the farm and invite those who don’t see biotechnology and pesticides as viable solutions to the table.

Borlaug, granddaughter of Nobel Peace Prize laureate and father of the Green Revolution Norman Borlaug, delivered the keynote talk at the 10th annual AgriBusiness Global Trade Summit, which kicked off in Orlando on Wednesday, March 17.

“One reason my grandfather’s Green Revolution was successful was because it involved multiple partners from different sectors. It involved economics, government, infrastructure, technology, and policy.”

Borlaug is Associate Director of External Relations at the Borlaug Institute for International Agriculture at Texas A&M University and works to further her grandfather’s legacy around the world. She commented on how everyone hears daily about the challenge of feeding 9 billion people by 2050 – a challenge can that can be met, but only as long as we are allowed to use the innovation and technology available.

Ensuring that access to agrotechnology endures means the crop input industry must change its messaging to the public, including getting more farmers instead of scientists involved to tell the story of agriculture, and encouraging more women to communicate the complexities of agriculture to other moms.

She described how the governments of India and Pakistan both met her grandfather’s demands, facilitating the success of his breakthrough semi-dwarf, high-yield, disease-resistant wheat beginning in the mid–1960s. “He demanded each government provided farmers with fair prices, access to credit, the infrastructure that was needed – especially irrigation and roads – but first and foremost, he demanded availability of inputs.”

Over the years, we have moved away from a collaborative approach, she says. “We have hundreds of thousands of NGOs across the world, in Africa and in Haiti, but we are tripping over ourselves. We need public-private partnerships,” she said. “We must be more transformative, interconnected, and bring in life sciences, the investors, the computer technology firms, entrepreneurs and the nutritional and medical community to the table when talking about food security.”

She added, “Biotechnology is not a silver bullet, but we have no right to bar any one system and not provide a farmer with choice as long as it’s safe and sustainable.”

Borlaug: How the Ag Industry Can Change the Conversation on Biotech, Pesticides | AgriBusiness Global

2 – Canola Falls on Weaker Soy | WP

ICE Canada canola futures fell on Wednesday, snapping a three-day winning streak, on pressure from commercial hedges and weaker U.S. soy prices.

Statistics Canada pegged this year’s canola production on the low range of expectations, which may have put some hesitation in the market.

Losses in crude oil and the vegetable oil market also weighed down values.

China is scheduled to limit the amount of dockage allowed in imports of Canadian canola on Sept. 1, which is causing some unease among traders.

Most-active November canola traded at times above the 50-day moving average around $473.25, but failed to stay at that level and trigger technical buying, a trader said.

November canola lost $3.40 at $468.80 per tonne after touching $475.70, its highest price since July 15.

January canola gave up $3.10 at $475.60.

November-January canola spread traded 1,360 times.

Soybean futures on the Chicago Board of Trade fell on Wednesday on strong U.S. crop prospects and mostly favourable weather conditions in the Midwest this week.

The trade closely watched the four-day Pro Farmer U.S. Midwest Crop Tour, which scouted impressive crops in central Illinois, following its observation a day earlier of above-average soybean pod counts in Nebraska and Indiana.

Illinois soybean crop potential was strong, with high pod counts and good soil moisture, scouts said.

The number of soybean pods in a three by three foot square averaged 1,458.2 pods along the two routes, up from 1,205.7 pods last year and the three-year tour average in these areas of 1,221.6 pods.

The tour does not project soybean yields but instead calculates the number of pods per square yard to gauge yield potential.

However, southwestern Iowa’s soybean crop potential looked below average.

U.S. soybeans benefit from strong demand due to production shortfalls in South America..

Most-active November soybean futures on the Chicago Board of Trade dropped 8 1/4 cents, or 0.9 percent, to $10.05 1/4 a bushel.

Chicago Board of Trade corn futures declined on Wednesday for a third straight session, pressured by optimism about U.S. crop prospects along with spillover weakness from soybeans and crude oil.

However, corn’s losses were more modest, as the Midwest Crop Tour results looked mixed.

Scouts on the western half of the annual Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour late Tuesday projected Nebraska’s corn yield at 158.60 bushels per acre, down from 165.16 in 2015 and below the tour’s three-year average of 161.29.

Scouts on the Pro Farmer tour’s eastern leg projected the Indiana corn yield at 173.42 bu. per acre, up both from last year’s estimate of 142.94 and the three-year crop tour average of 165.11.

Corn was further underpinned by a U.S. Department of Agriculture report that said private exporters sold 101,600 tonnes of U.S. corn to unknown destinations for 2016–17 delivery.

Most-active December corn futures lost one cent, or 0.2 percent, to $3.36 1/4. Prices earlier hit a low of $3.34 1/2 a bu., the weakest since Aug. 16.

Wheat is under pressure from expectations for Canada’s second-largest wheat crop in 25 years and a raised estimate for Ukrainian production.

Wheat futures on the Chicago Board of Trade closed lower on Wednesday, with the spot September contract losing ground to back months on spreads, traders said.

Traders expect the CME Group, parent of the CBOT, to raise maximum storage charges for CBOT wheat next month, a factor that tends to widen price spreads between wheat contracts, pressuring nearby months.

CBOT September wheat settled down 3 3/4 cents at $4.04 per bu.

MGEX spring wheat futures closed lower, led by the spot September contract as the Canadian spring wheat harvest approached.

Kansas City hard red winter wheat closed fractionally higher, gaining against CBOT wheat on hopes for a pickup in export demand for U.S. hard wheat.

All three U.S. markets remain anchored by plentiful domestic and global wheat supplies.

The stronger U.S. dollar is making U.S. grains less attractive to those holding other currencies.

Feed barley bids in the key cattle feeding area of Lethbridge were in the C$170-$175 per tonne range as of Aug. 19, which was $5-$10 lower than the previous week, according to provincial reports.

Feed wheat prices were in the $184-$192 range, which was down roughly $15 from the previous week.

The Canadian dollar was trading at $1.2912 to the U.S. dollar, or 77.45 U.S. cents at 12:55 p.m. CDT, little changed from Tuesday’s close.

Light crude oil nearby futures in New York were down $1.33 to US$46.77 per barrel.

The Canadian dollar at noon was US77.28 cents, down from 77.51 cents the previous trading day. The U.S. dollar at noon was C$1.2940.

ICE Futures Canada…

Canola Falls on Weaker Soy | WP

3 – Canola Watch August 24: Has that seed changed colour?

The ideal swath timing for yield and quality is when at least 60% of seeds on the main stem are colour changed and seeds in side branches are firm to roll. Not all canola can be swathed at that stage, but that’s the target.

How to assess seed colour change:

  1. Drive around the whole field to locate a couple of areas that best represent the stand, stage and yield potential. Bushwhack beyond the headlands and check a few plants in these areas.
  2. Isolate the main stem, which is typically the longest branch with the most pods. If it takes too long to ID the main stem, pick a different plant! OPEN pods from the bottom, middle and top of the main raceme. How many seeds have started to turn? Seed colour change (SCC) is considered any amount of yellow or brown on the seed. (See the handy photo above.)
  3. As a rough guideline for 60% SCC, seeds from the bottom third of the main stem are totally brown to purplish brown, seeds from the middle third are starting to turn, and seeds from the top third are green but firm.
  4. Look at seeds in the latest of the side branches. Even though they’re green, you want them to stay firm when rolled between thumb and forefinger. If these seeds are mushy, yield will likely benefit from waiting — if you have time.

READ MORE

4 – Chile Defines Strategy to Control Grapevine Moth | AgroNews

The grapevine moth (Lobesia botrana) was detected for the first time in Chile in the region of Linderos in the central part of the country. The plague, which originated in Europe, attacks vineyards, as its larvae feeds on the clusters, leading to decay and dehydration of the berries, reducing the yield.

Due to the serious damage inflicted by this insect, the Agriculture and Livestock Service (SAG) declared controlling the pest obligatory. Official control measures include surveillance to study the plague distribution in the country and to identify phytosanitary measures for spraying pesticides in areas where its presence is detected.

In these areas, quarantines or regulations will be established. A three-kilometer radius around the source of each outbreak is regulated. There will also be controls on vineyards and blueberry and plum farms located up to 500 meters from areas where the moth is detected.

SAG has updated the list of agrochemicals approved for the control of the grapevine moth for the 2016/2017 season. In this case, the list has 25 commercial products that were selected based on the results of tests by SAG. The list includes three pheromones that have been authorized for plague control.

Insecticide Table…

Chile Defines Strategy to Control Grapevine Moth | AgroNews

5 – Crop Conditions as of August 16, 2016 | Alberta Ag

Crop Conditions as of August 16, 2016 (Abbreviated Report)

Wide spread showers and thunderstorms have continued to dominate weather patterns over the past several weeks. However, most areas across the province have also had some sunny and warm days to help mature crops. Provincially, crop growing conditions did not change from a week ago and are rated as 84 per cent good to excellent, compared with the 5-year average (2011–2015) of 69 per cent (see Table 1). About 78 to 85 per cent of spring wheat, barley, canola and dry peas are in good to excellent conditions, while oats are at 90 per cent. Most spring cereal crops are at the dough development stage.

Harvest operations are beginning across the province slightly behind the 5-year average. Provincially, three per cent of crops are in the bin, compared to the 5-year average of four per cent and two per cent are in the swath, compared to the 5-year average of three per cent (see Table 2). About one per cent of spring wheat and canola, three per cent of barley and 19 per cent of peas in Alberta have been combined, while one per cent of spring wheat, two per cent of barley and dry peas and three per cent of canola are in the swath.

Surface and sub-surface soil moisture ratings (5-year averages in the brackets) across the province remained stable at 85 (62) and 81 (64) per cent good to excellent, respectively with two (one) and one (less than one) per cent excessive. Pasture conditions are rated as four (13) per cent poor, 18 (30) per cent fair, 60 (44) per cent good and 18 (13) per cent excellent. Tame hay conditions have similar ratings and are reported as six (13) per cent poor, 18 (31) per cent fair, 56 (43) per cent good and 20 (13) per cent excellent.

REGIONAL ASSESSMENTS:

The 2016 Alberta Crop Report Series continues to provide summaries for the following five regions:

Region One: Southern (Strathmore, Lethbridge, Medicine Hat, Foremost)

  • Rain showers continued with some hail reported, however, some good weather helped ripen crops in the Region. Cereals are mostly in ripening stage and canola has started to be swathed, while most of them are still green. Many producers are combining their peas, which have been desiccated. Overall, nine per cent of crops in the Region are in the bin and another five per cent are in the swat. Some sunny and warm weather is needed in the Region and it appears that pastures could be good for fall grazing.
  • Regionally, 68 per cent of crops are in good to excellent condition, down two per cent from a week ago and down six per cent from the 5-year average of 74 per cent.
  • Surface and sub-surface soil moisture conditions (5-year averages in brackets) are rated at 75 (46) and 73 (53) per cent good to excellent, respectively, with one (zero) per cent excessive surface or sub-surface soil moisture.
  • Pasture and tame hay are rated at 59 (46) and 53 (45) per cent good to excellent, respectively.

Region Two: Central (Rimbey, Airdrie, Coronation, Oyen)

  • Showers have helped maintain forage and pastures, as well as mature crops. Cereals are mostly in the dough development stage, while peas harvest is about to start with some peas that have been desiccated.
  • About 85 per cent of crops are rated as good to excellent, with no change from last week and up 18 per cent from the 5-year average of 67 per cent.
  • Surface and sub-surface soil moisture are respectively rated at 82 (72) and 81 (71) per cent good to excellent, with two (one) and one (one) percent excessive soil moisture.
  • While first cut hay is nearly completed in some areas, second cut hay has been started in other areas. Pasture and tame hay conditions are reported as 77 (58) and 75 (61) per cent good to excellent, respectively.

Region Three: North East (Smoky Lake, Vermilion, Camrose, Provost)

  • Spring cereals are mostly in the dough development stage and canola is filling. Fall seeded crops harvest is underway, while peas are desiccating. Some lodgings were reported due to the wind and rain. Also, sclerotinia disease was reported in a few canola fields.
  • Crop conditions are rated as 94 per cent good to excellent, with no change from last week and up 21 per cent from the 5-year average of 73 per cent.
  • Surface and sub-surface soil moisture conditions are reported as 96 (75) and 84 (72) per cent good to excellent, respectively, with two (one) per cent excessive for both surface and sub-surface soil moisture.
  • Haying is nearing completion with good quantity, but lower than average quality. Pasture and tame hay conditions are rated as 97 (67) and 97 (64) per cent good to excellent, respectively.

Region Four: North West (Barrhead, Edmonton, Leduc, Drayton Valley, Athabasca)

  • Most of spring cereals are in the dough development stage. Harvest operations have begun with some lodged barley crops being swathed. Peas are being sprayed, while the yield is lower than was earlier anticipated.
  • Regionally crop conditions are rated as 97 per cent good to excellent, with no change from the previous week and up 30 per cent from the 5-year average of 67 per cent.
  • Surface and sub-surface soil moisture conditions are rated as 91 (67) and 89 (60) per cent good to excellent, respectively, with three (two) and less than one (one) per cent excessive surface and sub-surface soil moisture.
  • Haying is nearing completion with average to poor quality. Pasture and tame hay conditions are rated as 82 (52) per cent and 85 (54) per cent good to excellent.

Region Five: Peace River (Fairview, Falher, Grande Prairie, Valleyview)

  • Warm weather has allowed producers to desiccate their cereals. Harvesting of peas has started and swathing of canola and peas is underway. About four per cent of crops are in swath and less than one per cent is combined.
  • Crop conditions are rated as 81 per cent good to excellent, down one per cent from a week ago and up 24 per cent from the 5-year average of 57 per cent. Spring cereals are mostly in dough development stage.
  • Surface and sub-surface soil moisture conditions are rated as 86 (53) and 85 (61) per cent good to excellent, respectively, with five (one) per cent excessive surface soil moisture.
  • Pasture and tame hay conditions are reported at 80 (60) and 79 (60) per cent good to excellent, respectively.

Crop Conditions as of August 16, 2016 | Alberta Ag

6 – DuPont’s New Product triflumezopyrim – Registered in China First | AgroNews](http://news.agropages.com/News/NewsDetail—19109.htm)

By Think Real – On 29th July, 2016, Institute for the Control of Agrochemicals, Ministry of Agriculture (ICAMA) has released the 7th batch of pesticide products to be approved this year. In this list, the new ingredient triflumezopyrim, researched and developed by DuPont, will get registered in China for the first time. This product includes 10% triflumezopyrim SC and 94% triflumezopyrim technical. And the registration target of that 10% triflumezopyrim SC is to control the rice planthoppers.

Triflumezopyrim, whose brand name is Pyraxalt™ and code name DPX-RAB55 and ZDI–2501, is the new mesoionic insecticide or zwitterionic insecticide researched and developed by DuPont. The new ingredient has efficient and durable control effects with lower consumption, which is also environmentally friendly. With good control effects on many kinds of pest like lepidoptera and homoptera, it mainly targets on controlling rice planthoppers and leafhoppers which can be used on crops like cotton, rice, corn and soybean, etc. According to DuPont, triflumezopyrim is pretty good at controlling rice planthoppers and in the future, it’s expected to set new standards in this market segment.

DuPont has submitted the registration information of triflumezopyrim to many key markets in the world and expects to get registered in China, Korea and Philippines first in 2016. By now, triflumezopyrim has been in the process of registration publicity in China which is expected to be the first venue for product launching.

DuPont’s New Product triflumezopyrim – Registered in China First | AgroNews

7 – Ourofino Launches Soil Insecticide in Brazil | AgroNews

The British public are overwhelmingly in favour of keeping or strengthening EU rules that protect our natural environment – including Britain’s under-threat bees – a new YouGov survey for Friends of the Earth published reveals.

The environmental campaign group is calling on the UK Government to guarantee that its Brexit strategy won’t lead to a weakening of environmental protections.

Ourofino Agrociência has announced the launch of the insecticide Terra Forte for the seed treatment market in Brazil. The new solution, based on Fipronil, is recommended for crops of soybeans, corn, cotton, and kidney beans and also for pasture. It acts to control major soil plagues and the initial stage of aerial plague insects, such as the Borer Beetle, caterpillars, the cucumber beetle, the June Beetle, and termites.

"The basis of any crop is the germination stage. When the producer invests in seed quality and protects it, he avoids losses and guarantees better germination and an adequate standard, which is reflected in increased productivity,” said Antônio Nucci, Research and Development Manager at Ourofino Agrociência.

Produced at the factory of the company in Uberaba (Minas Gerais), Terra Forte has a compatible density for the industrial seed treatment equipment, allowing different calibrations of usage. “It is a product with a liquid formulation and improved syrup homogenization, as well as adequate density. Besides this, it offers greater ease in cleaning industrial equipment,” explained Marco Antonio Cunha, Product Manager (Insecticide).

According to the manufacturer, Terra Forte inspires confidence because of its wide spectrum control and extended residual effect, which protects the crop from insects that attack the seeds and helps increase yield. “The choice of product is an important factor in the success of this practice,” stated agronomist and consultant Silvestre Belletini.

The product manager of Ourofino Agrociência pointed out that exposing untreated seeds to soil plagues, including for pasture, could result in heavy losses for producers. Depending on the type of infestation, the losses could be significant – up to 20% of the crop. “The attacks on seeds that are not treated can delay the formation of the pasture and generate productivity problems,” said Cunha.

Ourofino Launches Soil Insecticide in Brazil | AgroNews

8 – Poll Finds Public Want to Keep EU Pesticide Rule | AgroNews](http://news.agropages.com/News/NewsDetail—19120.htm)

The British public are overwhelmingly in favour of keeping or strengthening EU rules that protect our natural environment – including Britain’s under-threat bees – a new YouGov survey for Friends of the Earth published reveals.

The environmental campaign group is calling on the UK Government to guarantee that its Brexit strategy won’t lead to a weakening of environmental protections.

The YouGov survey revealed:

  • 83 per cent said Britain should pass laws providing a higher (46 per cent) or the same (37 per cent) level of protection for wild areas and wildlife species than current EU laws. Only four per cent want lower protection.
  • 57 per cent said British farming subsidies should put either more (25 per cent) or the same (32 per cent) emphasis on environmental protection than the current EU subsidies do. Only seven per cent said British farming subsidies should put less emphasis on protecting the environment.
  • 81 per cent want to keep an EU ban on neonicotinoid pesticides that have been found to pose a threat to bees, with only five per cent saying it should end.

The survey also revealed that those who voted to leave the EU were also strongly in favour of maintaining or increasing the protection for nature that is currently provided by EU legislation, and linking farming subsidies to environment protection.

Friends of the Earth campaigner Samuel Lowe said: "This survey sends a powerful message to the UK Government that EU rules aimed at protecting our natural environment must be maintained or strengthened.

"The poll completely undermines those who argue that Brexit should lead to a watering down of the UK’s environmental commitments. There is little public support for this – even from those who voted to leave the EU.

“The Government must also stand up to pressure from the NFU and keep the EU ban on bee-harming neonicotinoid pesticides. This is what the science says, and the public demands.”

The NFU said its expert was unavailable to comment on this poll, but the union has said: “The NFU remains committed to its lobbying for science-based regulation across the board and this very much includes the regulation which is restricting farmers’ use on plant protection products. Without many of these products, our ability to produce wholesome, affordable food for the nation, will continue to stagnate.”

HortWeek – Poll Finds Public Want to Keep EU Pesticide Rule | AgroNews

9 – [US EPA to Discuss the Regulation of Plant-Incorporated Protectants | AgroNews](http://news.agropages.com/News/NewsDetail—19114.htm)

EPA’s Biopesticides and Pollution Prevention Division will hold a public symposium on the data that support the registration of plant-incorporated protectants (PIPs) on September 29.

A plant-incorporated protectant is a type of biopesticide that is produced and used in a living plant, or in its produce. These products are, therefore, distinct from topically applied conventional pesticides. PIPs can, under certain circumstances, be regulated by USDA, FDA and EPA, with each agency having specific responsibilities.

The symposium will provide a forum for PIP developers, the agricultural sector and the general public to receive information firsthand on the scope of the scientific review process that determines the safety of PIPs and on the pesticide registration process as a whole. The majority of PIPs registered in the past 20-plus years use insecticidal traits of bacterial proteins to enhance the plant’s resistance to insect herbivores. EPA, FDA and USDA representatives will give an overview of the regulatory system that applies to biotechnology in the United States in the context of the Coordinated Framework for Regulation of Biotechnology.

EPA to Discuss the Regulation of Plant-Incorporated Protectants | AgroNews | AgroNews

10 – Viterra Books Lower First-Half Revenues for Glencore | AGCanada

“Average” crops and lower prices on the Prairies in the first half of 2016 led to results “substantially below” those in the year-earlier period for Viterra’s Canadian operations.

Viterra’s owner, Swiss commodity mining/marketing firm Glencore, on Wednesday reported a nine per cent drop in revenues across its global agricultural products business, from (10.74 billion in the first half of 2015, to $9.73 billion in the half ending June 30 (all figures US)).

The agricultural arm’s adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) for the first half came in at $154 million, down from $261 million in the year-earlier period.

“The smaller stock carry-over, average crop size and lower prices meant that farmers were often reluctant sellers,” Glencore said of Viterra Canada’s results in its H1 report.

“Combined with strong competition amongst the handling industry and continued weakness in the Canadian dollar, this led to reduced U.S. dollar procurement margins, particularly for wheat.”

Other “negatives” weighing on Regina-based Viterra’s Canadian results included “quality issues” in durum wheat, China’s “objections” to levels of Canadian canola imports, “disruption” in pulse crop shipments to India and higher domestic rail freight rates, the company said.

Viterra’s Australian business, meanwhile, was “negatively impacted” by a smaller South Australian crop, a weaker Australian dollar and a “slower export pace,” as Australia’s wheat “lacked world market competitiveness,” Glencore said.

That said, crops in both Canada and Australia are “currently progressing well and, if above-average crops materialize, this would be helpful for H2 2016 results.”

Across its global ag business, Glencore said its grain and oilseed marketing “performed satisfactorily, given the generally abundant crops, the low-priced environment and, in the case of grain, a lack of volatility.”

Procurement margins, Glencore said, were “consistently narrow,” with “limited” arbitrage opportunities. With lower global prices, despite “strong” regional exports, port throughput rates declined in the former Soviet Union, “which impacted our business in this region.”

Glencore’s agricultural processing and production, meanwhile, saw a 43 per cent increase from H1 2015 levels, mainly due to its added crush capacity.

The added capacity comes from its 50 per cent stake in the former Pacific Coast Canola plant at Warden, Wash., bought in January from Winnipeg-based Legumex Walker, and from the former TRT-ETGO canola and soybean crush plant at Becancour, Que., which Glencore bought in late 2015.

Glencore, in a recent bid to dial back its debts, is in the midst of selling 49.99 per cent of its Glencore Agri business, with 40 per cent going to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB) and 9.99 per cent to B.C. Investment Management Corp. (bcIMC), the investment firm for British Columbia’s public-sector pension funds.

“Since we announced our measures to reduce debt levels last September, we have made considerable progress towards achieving our goals,” Glencore CEO Ivan Glasenberg said in Wednesday’s release.

“We have already largely achieved our asset disposals target of ($4 billion to $5 billion) with a diverse and material pool of asset sales’ processes also ongoing… We remain confident and focused on achieving even lower than previously indicated net funding and net debt levels by the end of this year.”

The Glencore Agri stake sale, he said, “positions it for the industry’s inevitable consolidation in the years to come.”

In all, Glencore reported a first-half loss of $615 million on revenues of $69.425 billion, compared to an $817 million loss on $73.857 billion in the year-earlier period. Losses attributable to Glencore equity holders amounted to $369 million, compared to a $676 million loss in the first half of 2015. — AGCanada.com Network

Viterra Books Lower First-Half Revenues for Glencore | AGCanada